Football in Italy

Football is the most popular sport in Italy. The Italian national football team has won the FIFA World Cup four times (1934, 1938, 1982, 2006), trailing only Brazil (with 5), and also appearing in two finals (1970, 1994). They have also won one European championship (1968), one Olympic football tournament (1936) and two Central European International Cups. Italy's club sides have won 27 major European trophies, making them the most successful nation in European football. The Italian word for football is calcio and this is the word used to make reference to the sport in Italy, as opposed to football in England or soccer in the United States and Canada. The Italy national football team (Italian: Nazionale di calcio dell'Italia), represents Italy in association football and is controlled by the Italian Football Federation (FIGC), the governing body for football in Italy. Italy is considered to be one of the best national teams in international football. Italy is the second most successful national team in the history of the World Cup behind Brazil (5), having won 4 titles (1934, 1938, 1982, 2006) and also appearing in two finals (1970, 1994). They have also won one European championship (1968), one Olympic football tournament (1936) and two Central European International Cups. The traditional colour of the national team (as well as all Italian national teams and athletes officially representing Italy) is azure blue[2] (azzurro, in Italian), due to the "Azzurro Savoia" (Savoy Blue), the colour traditionally linked to the royal dynasty which unified Italy in 1861, and maintained in the official standard of the Ital

an President. The team does not have a designated "home stadium" like certain national teams. The primary training ground is at the FIGC headquarters in Coverciano, Florence and the team plays their home matches at various stadiums throughout Italy. The UEFA European Football Championship is the main association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), the sport's European governing body. Held every four years since 1960, in the even-numbered year between World Cup tournaments, it was originally called the UEFA European Nations Cup, changing to the current name in 1968. Starting with the 1996 tournament, specific championships are often referred to in the form "Euro 2012" or whichever year is appropriate. Prior to entering the tournament all teams other than the host nations (which qualify automatically) compete in a qualifying process. The championship winners earn the opportunity to compete in the following FIFA Confederations Cup, but are not obliged to do so.[1] The 14 European Championship tournaments have been won by nine different national teams: Germany and Spain each have won three titles, France has two titles, and Soviet Union, Italy, Czechoslovakia, Netherlands, Denmark and Greece have won one title each. To date, Spain are the only side in history to have won consecutive titles, doing so in the 2008 and 2012 editions. The most recent championship, co-hosted by Poland and Ukraine in 2012, was won by Spain, who beat Italy 4–0 at the final in Kiev. The next European Championship will be hosted in France.