Split of the Championship

In November 1907, FIF (Federazione Italiana Foot-Ball, the former name of FIGC) decided to create an Italian championship reserved only for Italian players in order to allow weaker clubs composed only by Italian players ("squadre pure italiane", "pure italian teams") to compete and win the "Italian championship" against the big clubs composed mostly by stronger foreign players ("squadre spurie internazionali", "spurious international teams"). The former championship, where foreign players, too, were allowed to play, was renamed "Federal Championship". In 1908 FIF organized two championships in the same season:[9] Federal Championship, where also foreign players (if they live in Italy) are allowed to play; the Federal Champions win Coppa Spensley[10] Italian Championship, where only Italian players are allowed to play; the Italian Champions win Coppa Buni The big clubs (Genoa, Torino and Milan) withdrew from both the championships in order to protest against the autarchical policy of FIF. The Federal Championship was won by Juventus against Doria. On May 7, 1908, three days before Juventus-Doria 5-1 (the decisive match), the newspaper La Stampa wrote: "Il match di domenica si annuncia oltremodo interessante, trattandosi del possesso definitivo della Coppa e del titolo di Campione d'Italia" ("The sunday match is announced to be very interesting, since it will definitely award the Cup and the title of Champions of Italy").[11] However, Juventus wasn't awarded the Spensley Cup because Milan (the former champions) refused to award the Cup to the new Champion, Juventus, giving it to Spensley and his team, Genoa.[12] In November 1908, FIF decided to award the Spensley Cup permanently to Milan. 1n 1908 The Italian Championship and Coppa Buni were won by Pro Vercelli beating Juventus, Doria and US Milanese. However, only Pro Vercelli was later recognized as "Italian Champions 1908", forgetting the Federal Championship won by Juventus. In 1909 season, too, two different championships were organized: Federal Championship, where also foreign players (if they live in Italy) are allowed to play; the Federal Champions win Coppa Oberti Italian Championship, where only Italian players are allowed to play; the Italian Champions win Coppa Buni The Federal Championship was won by Pro Vercelli, beating in the Final US Milanese, while Juventus was eliminated in the first round of Piedmont Group by Torino. On January 25, 1909 La Stampa wrote: "E la Juventus g dra di un certo riposo, che le auguriamo foriero di miglioramento di stile di gioco, e preludio necessario ad assicurarsi l'altro campionato, quello piu ambito ancora: il Campionato italiano!" ("Juventus will enjoy some rest; we hope that this rest will improve the play style and will be the necessary prelude to win the other championship, the most coveted one: the Italian Championship!").[13] The Italian Championship was won by Juventus, beating in the Final US Milanese.[14] However, only Pro Vercelli was later recognized as "Italian Champions 1909", forgetting the Italian Championship won by Juventus. The format was modified for the 1909Ц10 season which was played in a league format. Nine clubs participated playing each other both home and away. The split between Federal and Italian championship was not completely abolished, because, while unifying these tournaments, it was decided to assign to the end of the season two titles: I Campionati Nazionali di calcio sono di I e II Categoria. Quello di I Categoria e suddiviso in Campionato Federale e Campionato Italiano. Al primo possono prendere parte anche giuocatori di nazionalita estera, residenti in Italia, il secondo e riservato esclusivamente ai giuocatori di nazionalita italiana.["There are two National Football Championships: Prima and Seconda Categoria. The Prima Categoria Championship is divided into Federal and Italian championship. In the first one foreign players living in Italy, too, are allowed to play, in the second one only players of Italian nationality are allowed to play. " (Article 2 of the Championship Rules promulgated the FIGC to Milan on August 8, 1909)] [15] According to an article in the newspaper La Stampa dated December 24, 1909, at the end of the season will be "proclamato campione italiano il Club meglio classificato fra le squadre pure italiane, e campione federale il Club meglio classificato tra le squadre spurie internazionali" ("proclaimed Italian Champions the best placed club among pure italian teams and Federal Champions the best placed club among Spurious International Clubs").[16] At the end of the season, Pro Vercelli and Inter placed both in the first place, so a playoff was needed in order to assign the Federal title (the Italian one was won by Pro Vercelli). This season was the first victory for Football Club Internazionale Milano, who defeated the fourth team (boys 11 years old) of Unione Sportiva Pro Vercelli Calcio in the final by a score of 10Ц3.