Water polo

Water polo, or Water ball, is a team water sport. The playing team consists of six field players and one goalkeeper. The winner of the game is the team that scores the most goals. Game play involves swimming, treading water (using a sort of kicking motion known as "eggbeater kick"), players passing the ball while being defended by opponents, and scoring by throwing the ball into a net defended by a goalie. 'Man-up' (or 'power play') situations occur frequently. Water polo, therefore, has strong similarities to the land-based game of team handball. In many team sports which involve scoring goals, a goalkeeper (termed goaltender, netminder, goalie, or keeper in some sports) is a designated player charged with directly preventing the opposing team from scoring by intercepting shots at goal. Such positions exist in hurling, association football, Gaelic football, international rules football, handball, field hockey, ice hockey, netball, water polo, bandy, lacrosse, floorball, and other sports.The eggbeater kick is a hands-free form of treading water that allows the swimmer to remain vertical.[1] It is a style of kicking where the swimmer's legs alternate one-legged breaststroke kicks.[2] This form provides continuous support because there is no break in the kick.[3] The eggbeater kick allows the swimmer to freely use their hands,[4] remain stable in the water without swaying,[4] maintain a constant vertical position,[4] and conserve energy[clarify][citation needed]. However, it is also difficult to learn,[5] requires a lot of practice,[5] and can cause knee problems due to the circular ro

ation of the knee joint.[6]Handball (also known as team handball, Olympic handball, European team handball, European handball, or Borden ball[1]) is a team sport in which two teams of seven players each (six outfield players and a goalkeeper on each team) pass a ball to throw it into the goal of the other team. A standard match consists of two periods of 30 minutes, and the team with more goals scored wins. Modern handball is usually played indoors, but outdoor variants exist in the forms of field handball and Czech handball (which were more common in the past) and beach handball (also called sandball). The game is quite fast and includes body contact, as the defenders try to stop the attackers from approaching the goal. Contact is allowed only when the defensive player is completely in front of the offensive player; i.e., between the offensive player and the goal. Any contact from the side or especially from behind is considered dangerous and is usually met with penalties. When a defender successfully stops an attacking player (who loses the ball over a line), the play is stopped and restarted by the attacking team from the spot of the infraction or on the 9-metre line. Unlike in basketball, where players are allowed to commit only 5 fouls in a game, handball players are allowed an unlimited number of faults, which are considered good defence and disruptive to the attacking team's rhythm. Certain elements of the game are reminiscent of rugby: for instance, the degree of force that defence may use to stop the attacker with the ball, together with the lack of protections and helmets.